» » isfahan
Poll
which type of tourism is more suitable for visiting iran ?
Ecotourism & Geotourism Attractions
Cultural And Social
Sport Attractions
Religious Attractions
Health Attractions

0

Abyaneh of Isfahan

 

The province of Isfahan, in central Iran has a history stretching back thousands of years. There are lots of world-famous historical sites in every corner, attracting numerous Iranian and foreign tourists year-round. Perhaps one of most famous is Abyane, a very beautiful ancient village near the town of Kashan. It’s registered with UNESCO as one of the four most historic villages of Iran. (The others are Masule, Kandovan and Meimand.) This article is a brief survey of Abyane’s geographical location and the culture and traditions of its people. Much of the information included here is adapted from "Abyane and its People” by Zein-al Abedin Khansari.

 

Holy Savior Cathedral , also known as Vank Cathedral and The Church of the Saintly Sisters, is a cathedral in Isfahan, Iran. Vank means "monastery" or "convent" in the Armenian language.One of the largest and most beautiful churches of Iran, the cathedral was completed in 1664. It includes a bell-tower, built in 1702, a printing press, founded by Bishop Khachatoor, a library established in 1884, and a museum opened in 1905. 

Hasht Behesht Palace of Isfahan

 

The historic building called Hasht Behesht (Eight Paradises) represents residential palaces used in the later period of the Safavid dynasty, and was built during the reign of Shah Suleiman (1669 AD). Already a government property, the palace was originally surrounded by a vast garden and hundreds of similar buildings, also named Hasht Behesht, of which nothing remains except this interesting and beautiful palace.

Chehel Sotoun Palace of Isfahan


Chehel Sotoun is a pavilion in the middle of a park at the far end of a long pool, in Isfahan built by Shah Abbas II to be used for the Shah's entertainment and receptions. In this palace, Shah Abbas II and his successors would receive dignitaries and ambassadors, either on the terrace or in one of the stately reception halls.

Abbasi Hotel in Isfahan

 

 

The Abbasi Hotel (formerly known as the Shah Abbasi Hotel) is a hotel located in Isfahan, Iran.The building of this hotel was actually a Caravanserai built 300 years ago by the mother of the last Safavid King, Sultan Husayn, and gifted to the Chahar Bagh Seminary as source of income for the school. The structure was renovated in the 1950s by André Godard to fight and prevent degradation.The hotel currently has 225 rooms, suites and apartments each with unique and captivating decorations designed to bring to mind the interior of Safavid and Qajar palaces and mansions. The hotel is considered a treasure trove of Persian arts for the finesse of its wall paintings, mirrorwork, moqarnas arches, cutout stucco decorations, colored glass and lattice doors and windows.

Imam Masque Of Isfahan

 

The Masjid-i Shah was built on the south side of Isfahan's maydan, the royal square of Isfahan built under Shah 'Abbas and completed in 1602. Shah 'Abbas moved the capital of the Safavid dynasty to Isfahan in 1597 with the goal of centering political, religious, economic, and cultural activities, in the process shifting Isfahan's center away from the area surrounding the old Friday mosque in the north and relocating it closer to the Zayandeh river. The Masjid-i Shah was Shah 'Abbas's largest architectural monument. 

Ali Qapu Palace Of Isfahan

 

The royal palace of 'Ali Qapu dominates the south eastern side of the central square in Isfahan, formerly called the Meidan-e-Shah. Its name means "The High Gate" and its impressive entranceway was no doubt intended to symbolize the strength and authority of the Safavid monarchs who ruled the country, and, as the posters on the verandah show, this significance is retained even in present times when the square has been renamed Meidan-e-Imam.

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque Of Isfahan

 

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque is one of the architectural masterpieces of Safavid Iranian architecture, standing on the eastern side of Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan, Iran.Construction of the mosque started in 1603 and was finished in 1619. It was built by the chief architect Shaykh Bahai, during the reigh of Shah Abbas I of the Safavid dynasty. 

Naqsh-e Jahan Square Of Isfahan

 

Naqsh-e Jahan Square, known as Imam Square, formerly known as Shah Square , is a square situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran. Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now an important historical site, and one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. It is 160 metres (520 ft) wide by 560 metres (1,840 ft) long. The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. The Shah Mosque is situated on the south side of this square. On the west side is the Ali Qapu Palace. Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque is situated on the eastern side of this square and at the northern side Keisaria gate opens into the Isfahan Grand Bazaar.  

Ago Next