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The National Jewelry Treasury is housed within the Central Bank of the Islamic Republic of Iran, at the heart of the City of Tehran. Here is the most dazzling collection of gemstones and jewelry known in the world. The Crown Jewels of Iran have been little more than a legend in the past. Travelers marveled at the splendor surrounding the shahs of ancient Persia; but few were permitted to examine it in any detail. Now the most spectacular objects have been placed on public display and form one of the country's principal tourist attractions.

 

Carpet Museum Of Iran

 

Just north of the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Carpet Museum houses more than 100 pieces dating from the 17th century to the present day. It’s a great place to see the full range of regional patterns and styles found in Iran, plus a few unique carpets such as the Tree of Life with Kings and Notables. The permanent collection is downstairs while upstairs is for temporary exhibitions.The museum itself was designed by Farah Diba and mixes classic ‘70s style with carpet-inspired function – the exterior is meant to resemble threads on a loom, which cool down the main building by casting shadows on its walls. Flash photography is not allowed.



Grand Bazaar Of Tehran

 

Tehran's bustling and chaotic bazaar, reputedly the world's largest, covers a huge area and includes countless stalls selling just about everything imaginable. There are also mosques, guesthouses, banks and even a fire station within the sprawling area in south Tehran covered by the bazaar district. Most commodity sellers have grouped themselves together to form distinct "corridors" selling similar merchandize. The main business in Tehran's grand bazaar takes place around noon and between 5-7pm in the evening and visitors are encouraged to bargain over prices. The grand bazaar has a long history in Tehran and the bazaaris who run it tend to be conservative and helped finance the Islamic Revolution in 1979. 

Azadi Tower Of Tehran

 

The Azadi Tower, formerly known as the Shahyad (a translation of King Memorial Tower), is the symbol of Tehran and marks the entrance to the city. Standing guard like a sentry at the gates of Tehran, Iran, is the impressive Azadi Tower (Freedom Tower), built in 1971 and comprised of eight thousand white marble blocks. A combination of both Islamic and Sassanid architectural styles, the fifty-foot high tower commemorates the formation of the Persian Empire and is an interesting combination of both modern and ancient cultures.

Imam Masque Of Isfahan

 

The Masjid-i Shah was built on the south side of Isfahan's maydan, the royal square of Isfahan built under Shah 'Abbas and completed in 1602. Shah 'Abbas moved the capital of the Safavid dynasty to Isfahan in 1597 with the goal of centering political, religious, economic, and cultural activities, in the process shifting Isfahan's center away from the area surrounding the old Friday mosque in the north and relocating it closer to the Zayandeh river. The Masjid-i Shah was Shah 'Abbas's largest architectural monument. 

Ali Qapu Palace Of Isfahan

 

The royal palace of 'Ali Qapu dominates the south eastern side of the central square in Isfahan, formerly called the Meidan-e-Shah. Its name means "The High Gate" and its impressive entranceway was no doubt intended to symbolize the strength and authority of the Safavid monarchs who ruled the country, and, as the posters on the verandah show, this significance is retained even in present times when the square has been renamed Meidan-e-Imam.

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque Of Isfahan

 

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque is one of the architectural masterpieces of Safavid Iranian architecture, standing on the eastern side of Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan, Iran.Construction of the mosque started in 1603 and was finished in 1619. It was built by the chief architect Shaykh Bahai, during the reigh of Shah Abbas I of the Safavid dynasty. 

Naqsh-e Jahan Square Of Isfahan

 

Naqsh-e Jahan Square, known as Imam Square, formerly known as Shah Square , is a square situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran. Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now an important historical site, and one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. It is 160 metres (520 ft) wide by 560 metres (1,840 ft) long. The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. The Shah Mosque is situated on the south side of this square. On the west side is the Ali Qapu Palace. Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque is situated on the eastern side of this square and at the northern side Keisaria gate opens into the Isfahan Grand Bazaar.